“Do You Know Who I Am?”

by Lee Buford on May 3, 2010

We all are burdened by our innate sense of entitlement from time to time. It’s part of our depraved human nature.

Of course, this is NOT  a good thing!

I was reminded of this today when visiting a large wholesale club, where I happened to walk by a disgruntled customer voicing his displeasure over the fact that he couldn’t find the particular item of his desires. I’m not sure if the club didn’t have what he wanted, or if he was simply upset that he wasn’t getting his “due” service and response. The man angrily barked at the club associate, saying, “Go check my record! I’ve been a member here since you opened, and this is ridiculous!”

Now let me acknowledge that we have all been forced to deal with poor service, disgruntled employees, and/or out-of-stock products when shopping in stores or eating in restaurants from time to time. It’s part of life. And in certain cases a  “complaint” is well-served and even appropriate. But in this case I was particularly struck by the man’s sense of entitlement, as if to say, “Do you know who I am? Do you know how long I’ve been a member?”

I was instantly reminded of a scenario I’ve heard recounted several times by sports talk-show host Jim Rome, where he addresses the “Do you know who I am?” comeback to a certain event or occurrence. Rome notes the following, which I think is brilliant:

If you have to play that card and ask, “Do you know who I am?”, you need to understand that:
          a.) they don’t know who you are
                                      -or-
          b.) they don’t care who you are

Think about that the next time you’re about to play that card, even if only in your mind. Individually we are all insignificant in the grand scheme of things, and the overwhelming sense of entitlement we feel is unfounded and unwarranted.
 

“…for apart from me you can do nothing.” – John 15:5 – ESV

Instead, consider how you might make a difference by playing a different card. You are guaranteed a better response in return.

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